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Publication Title | WORKING TOWARDS POLICY CREATION FOR CRUISE SHIP TOURISM IN PARKS AND PROTECTED AREAS OF NUNAVUT

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Tourism in Marine Environments, Vol. 4, No. 2, pp. 00–00 1544-273X/07 $60.00 + .00 Printed in the USA. All rights reserved. Copyright © 2007 Cognizant Comm. Corp. www.cognizantcommunication.com

WORKING TOWARDS POLICY CREATION FOR CRUISE SHIP TOURISM IN PARKS AND PROTECTED AREAS OF NUNAVUT

JANET R. MARQUEZ and PAUL F.J. EAGLES

Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada

This article provides an understanding of the goals and operational procedures of current cruise ship operators in Nunavut and gives insight into the policies necessary to effectively manage cruise ship tourism in Nunavut. The exploratory research found that cruise tourism in Nunavut is perceived as a safe and economically viable industry. However, a number of important issues emerged: 1) the need for policies and guidelines to aid in the management of parks and protected areas in Nunavut; 2) the desire for unity across the Arctic cruise ship tourism industry; 3) the requirement for greater govern- ment awareness and assistance, and 4) the need for more research particularly from local perspectives.

Keywords: Cruise ship tourism; Nunavut; Polar region; Cruise ships; Parks; Protected areas

Introduction

The global cruise industry initiated a period of considerable growth when, in the 1970s, “operators first offered a mass market product to a broader and younger clientele” (Marsh & Staple, 1995, p. 63). As the market diversified and ice-breaking vessels became available with the collapse of the former Soviet Union, cruise tourism to the Canadian Arctic became a possibility. This became reality in 1984 when Salen Lindblad sailed the MS Explorer through the Northwest Passage (Jones, 1999; Snyder & Shackleton, 1986). A representative of the Canadian Wildlife Service indicated that the volume of cruise tourism to Arctic Canada grew slowly from 98 people in 1984 to several thousand people in 2000. (M.

Mallory, personal communication, July 29, 2004). The national parks managed by Parks Canada and the and the wildlife areas managed by the Canadian Wildlife Service are attractive, natural destinations for cruise ships, because, in addition to their areas of natural and cultural interest, most of them have a shoreline, making them accessible to cruise vessels (Figs. 1 and 2).

Because the volume of cruise ship tourism to Nunavut is relatively small in comparison to cruise ship tourism volume in other destinations, less at- tention has been paid to the management of this ac- tivity and to impacts that this form of tourism has on the natural and human environment. However, “given the fragility of some of the Canadian Arctic environments and the vulnerability of small, remote,

Address correspondence to Paul F. J. Eagles, Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada N2L 3G1. E-mail: eagles@health.uwaterloo.ca

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